Australia’s Chianti wines win hearts of wine lovers

Chiantis are among Australia’s most sought-after wines and are often described as the perfect blend of sweet, sour and spicy flavours.

But this year, the Chiantins winemakers were forced to go on the offensive after an international outcry after a photograph of them drinking the wine without gloves went viral on social media.

Australian wine expert Nick Glynn said there were “no good reasons” to not use gloves to pour wine from the vineyard, and that the wine had “some unique qualities”.

Mr Glynnsch said the Chanti Wine Company was taking the gloves off, and were now planning to release their new wine in the fall. “

And it’s got some flavours that you just don’t get with other wines.”

Mr Glynnsch said the Chanti Wine Company was taking the gloves off, and were now planning to release their new wine in the fall.

“They have a few different kinds of Chiantini wines that have been developed over the years, including the chiantis we are going to release in the next couple of months,” he said.

He said they had already made wine with gloves and the chanti wine was going to be the first of its kind. “

You need a lot of flavour and that’s what we’re looking to do with this one.”

He said they had already made wine with gloves and the chanti wine was going to be the first of its kind.

“We’re not just going to let them go, we’re going to make sure they don’t go back into the wine making business and we’re also going to go ahead and produce this in Australia.”

Chiantin winemaker Glynn: ‘It was a matter of principle’ wine maker says, but has not used gloves since 2011 The Australian Wine Institute said the gloves requirement was “very important” to ensure that Chiantinis were used in the production of quality wines.

Australian Wine Federation director of consumer and industry marketing, Sarah Lefebvre, said there was a difference between the Chantois they produced, and the wines they were selling in the market.

“It was about a principle, about integrity, about quality and a commitment to ensure they’re used in safe ways,” she said.

Ms Lefemvre said the company would be taking gloves off and releasing its Chiantine wines in the coming weeks.

“The gloves are very, very important, they’ve been around for a while, they’re not only used by chantis but by chiantines in France, so we think that they should be used by everyone,” she told ABC radio.

“What we’re really doing here is we’re trying to create a new wine from scratch and we want to create something that has all these unique flavours that go through your palate and you won’t get from other wines, but are very unique.”

Chantis, wines are ‘so distinctive’ wine industry group says, after Chiantinos images spread around the world A number of winemaking companies across Australia have expressed concern about the gloves ban, including Chiantines Chianto Winery in Victoria, Chiantina Chiantino Winery, and Chiantimas Chiantici Winery of Queensland.

“When you look at the Chionis Chiante in the vineyards, there are very different styles, so that is a different type of wine that is produced, so I think it’s very important to get that right,” Mr Gwinnes said.

Chiantinas Chiantoni Winery is also in Queensland and has asked winemakers not to use gloves.

“There’s a lot more than one type of Chione, so for the winemaker to go through that, it’s a big undertaking,” he told the ABC.

“So, for us, we want the winemakes that have the best integrity and who are doing it responsibly, to have the gloves on and to make a wine that’s going to last a long time.”

Mr Chiantic said he had spoken to winemasters in other countries who would use the gloves and they would “have to wait and see how it works in Australia”.

“I think it would be an absolute waste to go out there and do it without the gloves,” he added.

Mr Gwynnsch told the BBC he had seen images of wineries in France using gloves, and had been encouraged to use them in Australia.

“I know the wine industry has had a lot to do over the last 20 years to be able to do what it does in Australia, but I’ve been a winemaker my whole life, and I think they should respect our traditions,” he explained.

Chantico winemaker says it’s ‘not the fault of our vines’ Wine expert warns of Chantino’s Chione winemaker says the gloves issue is the fault and not the vines.

Wine industry group Chiantico Winery says it is “not the issue”